New Year's Day 2022 and in 2023 year

In seen list or in calendar views you can see when will be New Year's Day 2022 and New Year's Day 2023. You can plan your holidays, weekends and free days.

YearDateDayHolidayRegions
20223 JanuaryMondayNew Year's DayNational Holiday
20232 JanuaryMondayNew Year's DayNational Holiday
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Every 1st of January in the Gregorian calendar marks the beginning of the new year. And this same day is recognized in the United Kingdom as a bank holiday which is always celebrated colorfully with unique customs and traditions throughout the country.

Is New Year Day a Public Holiday?

In the United Kingdom, New Year’s Day is recognized as a bank Holiday. However, in a situation it falls in a non-working day such as Saturday or Sunday, a substitute holiday would be declared, and that would be next Monday that follows –first working day of the week.

How is New Year’s Day Celebrated in the United Kingdom?

New Year’s Day is a famous holiday as it is recognized worldwide. Usually, new year festivities in the UK begins on the eve of the 31st of December of every new year into the New Year’s Day, the 1st of January. Just as it is a collective celebration worldwide, there are New Year parties too in the UK. Some make use of the restaurants, bars, or on the street, counting down to the end of the year and wishing each other a happy new year with champagne and other sparkling beverages as the clock strikes midnight.

London Fireworks and Parade

There are different forms of displays in place towards the coming New Year in the United Kingdom. As a result, many cities and towns the incoming New Year with public firework displays. And this often has the people gathering at the bank of River Thames to have the first-hand experience of about 12-minute firework display over the London Eye, a giant Ferris wheel. The dazzling display begins just after Big Ben chimes midnight and is accompanied by music. Since 2014, this has been a ticketed occasion but not all part of the roads is made available to those who were issued a ticket. After the firework display, what follows is the London New Year’s Day Parade, considered to be the largest New Year parade in the world. It is a 30-year old tradition; the ceremony began in 1987 as a way to raise money for local charities. Originally called the Lord Mayor of Westminster’s Big Parade, the event was renamed in 1994.

Fire Festival in Allendale

This sort of festival is peculiar with the people of Allendale in Northumberland. They often begin the New Year festivities with fire procession, and that is why it is referred to as Fire Festival. Select-few men in this settlement are understood to being the ones who are responsible for carrying carry barrels full of lit tar on their heads across the village before throwing them into a bonfire in the village square.

Hogmanay, Loony Dook, and First Footing in Scotland

The word Hogmanay is a Scottish term or name for the last day of the year, and it is a day highly respected among the Scottish people as a custom of the land. It begins every 30th December yearly with a lighting-of-torch procession throughout Scotland and this coupled with Edinburgh’s parade being the biggest and the most popular. The 31st of December would always have the Scots ushering in the New Year with partying and singing Auld Lang Syne –a poem written by Robert Burns while holding with family, relatives, and friends. The following day, the 1st of January of the new year, people of Scotland often take part in a Loony Dook, an event where costume-wearing people jump into frozen bodies of water to raise money for charity. After that, there would then be another New Year tradition famously known as First Footing, where the first guest of the New Year brings gifts that symbolize good fortune comprising black buns, coal, salt, shortbread, and whiskey. Conventionally in Scotland, tall, dark, and handsome men were preferred to be the first-foot in a household.

Stonehaven’s Fireball Ceremony

The Fireball Ceremony is Stonehaven is a unique Scottish New Year tradition which often takes place at midnight, about 40 people would walk down High Street while swinging flaming balls over the head. The ceremony usually only lasts for just about 20 minutes and is followed by fireworks activities.

Calennig in Wales

This ceremony is peculiar with them in Wales as their New Year is often celebrated traditionally by exchanging gifts in an event known as Calennig. Children would go from door to door, carrying an apple skewered with sprigs of evergreens, corn and would sing songs of health and prosperity in exchange for money or food. In this contemporary time, this tradition is no longer widely practiced, as was the case, except in a few parts of the region. Conversely, people in Gwaun Valley in Pembrokeshire would wait for nearly two weeks after the 1st of January to celebrate their New Year or Hen Galan as it is their first day of the year in the Julian Calendar. Similarly, on this day, children would sing songs while visiting local homes just as it used to be with Calening in Wales.

Who Celebrates New Year in the UK?

The New Year celebration in the UK is celebrated by most people - both official and unofficial persons would not be going to their regular workplaces on this day. Even though employers are not legally obliged to give their employees a day off on the 1st of January, most places of business and work are closed on this day. So, so most either spend the day with their family and relatives or loved ones.

History of New Year

Based on the widely used calendar, Gregorian calendar, New Year’s Day is recognized as the beginning of the new year, and it is relatively recognized these days. However, Romans began marking the start of their civil year on the 1st of January in their calendar (before the Gregorian calendar, which was introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII). The conventional springtime opening of the growing season and time for major military campaigns still held on as the famous New Year celebration. The Gregorian calendar was adopted immediately in some areas of Europe but was not used by many countries until centuries later. The United Kingdom only started observing the Gregorian calendar in 1752, when 11 days were dropped because the UK is a multicultural society, hence not all people celebrate New Year’s Day on the 1st of January of Gregorian calendar. For instance, the New Year in the Hindu, Chinese, Coptic, Jewish, and Islamic calendars celebrate their new year on an entirely different date than as it is in the Gregorian calendar.

Interesting Notes:

In a situation where the New Year, the 1st of January falls on a Sunday, by Royal Proclamation, it is recognized as New Year’s Day as against Bank Holiday, which would then be the following day, Monday. Yet, for those familiar with British holiday, whether it falls or not on Sunday, it is recognized as New Year’s Day holiday.